Article: New Physics [and Engineering] Lab[s] open in Building 8 - Physics Department in the News

New Physics [and Engineering] Lab[s] open in Building 8

By Miguel Cerda, Staff writer.

Thursday, September 10, 2009—Reprinted from Monitor.

Jenner Banks, Frank Liu and Marcus McCrary get some work done in the new Physics lab located in Building 8.Jenner Banks, Frank Liu and Marcus McCrary get some work done in the new Physics lab located in Building 8. —Photo by Jimmy Patten.

Engineering and Physics students are now enjoying well-organized labs. Since moving to Building 8 from Building 6, proficiency in these two departments has greatly increased due to a well-organized and carefully managed inventory of all lab equipment.

According to Professor Georgina Wilson-Gonzalez, moving the labs to this new location helps reduce costs because now that the two labs are next door to each other they can easily share materials as well as share materials with the Chemistry and Biotechnology labs.

Communication between the physics and engineering teachers have also been made much easier now that the labs have a sliding door between them.

“One of our academic goals is to cluster similar departments together,” said Dean Ron Quinta.

Before this semester, the physics lab was located on the first floor of Building 6, and the engineering lab was located on the third floor.

Since nursing and respiratory therapy moved from Building 8 to the Newark Center, Rooms 8104 and 8105 became the proposed locations for the labs.

Because the Physics lab has been relocated closer to the other science classes, Ohlone had their $100,000 atomic force microscope moved from the Newark Center to a small room within the physics lab so that the students studying different sciences in the main campus could have an opportunity to use it.

The leftover money from the bond that supported the construction of the Newark Center and the Student Services Center was used to remodel and paint the rooms in Building 8 this summer.

The exact cost is unknown, but according to the dean, Ohlone saved at least 50 percent of what it would have spent if a contractor was hired to do the remodeling.