Philosophy Department

Philosophy Courses

Register for classes using WebAdvisor. Review the searchable online Class Schedule for class dates and times. Course descriptions are available in the Catalog. All students are encouraged to meet with a counselor to review academic program requirements and/or have questions answered. Courses for this discipline include:

  • PHIL-100 Introduction to Philosophy
  • PHIL-101 Ancient Philosophy
  • PHIL-102 Modern Philosophy
  • PHIL-104 Logic
  • PHIL-106 Ethics
  • PHIL-107 Practical Reasoning
  • PHIL-109A Understanding the Old Testament
  • PHIL-109B Understanding the New Testament
  • PHIL-110 Introduction to Asian Religions
  • PHIL-112 Introduction to Western Religions
  • PHIL-114 Introduction to Islam
  • PHIL-116 Bioethics
  • PHIL-118 Latin American Philosophy

Textbooks, Online Access Codes, Other Supplies and Resources

Most Ohlone College classes require the purchase of a textbook, and some classes require the purchase of online access codes (also known as keys) or other supplies. Most of these purchases are available at the Ohlone College Bookstore.

Students may go to the Ohlone College Bookstore website to find the textbook(s), access codes (keys), or supplies for their class(es). Students may be required to pay additional fees for access to online resources that are not available through the Ohlone College Bookstore. Please check with your instructor.

More at Textbooks: Information and Purchasing, including Online Orders, Newark Center Textbooks and Supplies, Book Buybacks, and Textbook Costs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the courses in this discipline, the student will have acquired the following knowledge and skills:

  • Define key terms of the philosophical vocabulary relevant to the course.
  • Distinguish different areas of philosophy and philosophical methodology.
  • Understand some of the diverse assumptions and values that shape our experiences and attitudes.
  • Read at a comprehension level that is appropriate for a college student.
  • Write an argumentative essay.
  • Think critically assess real world issues, and the various perspectives on them.
  • Evaluate good and bad arguments.
  • Understand and communicate abstract ideas.

Related Information at Ohlone

Division

Arts and Social Sciences Division.