2006-2007 Archives for the Ohlone College World Forum

Is the Government Listening In On You?

Collage of surveillance-like images. Ohlone College World Forum: Is the Government Listening In On You?What Warrant-less surveillance of Citizens by the National Security Agency Can Teach Us About Separation of Powers in the U.S.

  • Thursday, February 22, 2007
  • Speaker: 12:00pm (noon) - 1:00pm
  • Q & A: 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Epler Gymnasium (Building 9)

Speaker Biography: John Cary Sims, Professor of Law, McGeorge School of Law, Sacramento, CA, J.D., Harvard University, 1974

John Cary Sims.Professor Sims was an attorney for eleven years for a public interest firm in Washington D.C., has argued complex cases in several state and federal courts including the U.S. Supreme Court, and taught law for 20 years. His primary research interests involve human rights and problems arising under the First Amendment.

Education:

Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA
J.D., magna cum laude, 1974.

Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.
A.B., magna cum laude, 1971 -
Majors in economics and in government with departmental honors.

Employment:

Professor of Law, University of the Pacific/McGeorge School of Law, Sacramento, California. 1989- (Associate Professor, 1986-1989).

Courses taught: Constitutional Law; International Protection of Human Rights; National Security Law; Professional Responsibility; Federal Courts; Administrative Law; First Amendment; Remedies.

Bar Admissions:

California, 1986; Massachusetts, 1974 (inactive); the District of Columbia, 1975 (inactive); the Supreme Court of the United States; and other federal courts.

A Global Perspective on the Darfur Region of Sudan

  • Speaker: Paul Freedman , Peabody award-winning independent filmmaker
  • Monday, November 13, 2006
  • Two sessions: 12:00pm (noon) and 7:00pm
  • Session One: 12:00pm (noon) - 12:50pm; Q & A begins at 1:00pm
    • Jackson Theatre, Smith Center (overflow seating in TV Studio "A", Smith Center)
  • Session Two: 7:00pm - 8:00pm; Q & A begins at 8:00pm
    • Jackson Theatre, Smith Center

  • New! To accommodate evening students, faculty, and staff, this presentation will be repeated at 7:00pm on November 13 in Jackson Theatre.

Large gathering of African people, mostly children. Ohlone College World Forum: A Global Perspective on the Darfur Region of Sudan.Paul Freedman, Peabody award-winning independent filmmaker and bay area native, explores the warfare and genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan through his newest documentary, over 2 ½ years in the making.

Darfur, an arid and impoverished region bordering on Chad and Libya, has faced many years of tension over land and grazing rights between nomadic Arabs and local farmers.  The recent conflict began in 2003 after rebel groups began attacking government targets, saying the government is oppressing black Africans in favor of the Arabs.

Because a significant portion of Mr. Freedman's presentation will include a recently completed film on Darfur, this particular forum will be held in Jackson Theatre. We expect a capacity audience and will provide overflow seating in "Studio A" with a direct audio/visual feed from Jackson Theatre.

Pathfinder

Pathfinder: A Global Perspective on the Darfur Region of Sudan. This Pathfinder, compiled by the Ohlone College Library, is provided as a guide to further exploration via supplementary resources online.

Speaker Biography: Paul Freedman, Director, Editor

Paul Freedman began his film career as an editorial assistant for television commercials.  His list of commercial editing credits spans a decade, and includes spots for Nike, Diet Coke, Southwest Airlines, and numerous others.  Paul has also cut opening title sequences for feature films such as “Space Jam” and “Father’s Day.”  His first big editing job, however, came on a documentary film about minor league baseball.  While remaining ever-passionate about documentary filmmaking, Paul decided to parlay his vast editing experience into directing.  Soon thereafter, Paul was helming spots for Nissan, Budweiser, Pennzoil, and the like, while becoming a member of the Director’s Guild of America in the process.  Through it all, Paul’s love of documentary filmmaking remained steadfast. 

In 1994, Paul teamed with fellow director Greg DeHart on the historical military documentary, “The Tears of Peleliu,” a survivor’s account of a brutal and controversial battle fought in World War II.  He also directed the award-winning, tongue-in-cheek documentary, “Human Products,” (inspired by a stint living in the U.K.) about a plumber and an electrician who make a brief and unlikely splash on the London art scene.  Soon thereafter, Paul decided to dedicate all of his energy to the documentary world, and, in 2001, teamed with DeHart and Bill Brummel Productions to edit “Pol Pot’s Secret Prison,” a History Channel doc about the infamous Tuol Sleng Prison in Phnom Phen.  The piece went on to win the International Documentary Association’s (IDA) top honor for “Documentary in a Continuing Series” and was also nominated for two Emmy Awards.   Paul also cut the Randy Vasquez documentary, “Testimony: The Maria Guardado Story,” the riveting account of a Salvadoran woman who survived torture and became a human rights activist in the U.S.  “Testimony” won Best Picture at the 2002 New York Latino Film Festival.  Paul continued his collaboration with DeHart and Brummel, following up with more docs for The History and Discovery Channels, including “Inside North Korea,” “Saddam’s Bombmaker,” “MIA-Solved,” and others. 

Paul soon turned again to directing, and, in 2003, wrote, directed, and edited the narrative short, “Such’s Life” - an unnerving day-in-the-life of a suicidal man who finds himself at the center of a murder investigation. 

“Such’s Life” won Paul the Silver Award at Houston’s WorldFest in 2004.  However, Paul’s career would be jolted and re-defined, yet again, when he was sent to Rwanda by Bill Brummel Productions and The History Channel to document the Rwandan genocide and its aftermath.  The resultant film, “Rwanda—Do Scars Ever Fade?” would go on to earn Paul a Peabody Award, two more Emmy nominations, and the IDA’s prestigious ABC News/VideoSource Award for best use of news and archival footage.  This filmmaking experience would change Paul forever.  Somewhere in Rwanda’s “killing fields,” Paul found the focus of his career: the documentary as a tool for social change.  It since has become Paul’s impassioned goal and commitment to tell the immediate story of the “next Rwanda” - Darfur, Sudan - before it, too, becomes the tragic subject of yet another historical documentary.

Paul holds a B.F.A. in Playwriting from San Francisco State University. He is married, and the devoted father of two.

Immigration and U.S./Mexico Relations

  • Mexico and USA flags. Ohlone College World Forum: Immigration and U.S./Mexico Relations.Tuesday, September 26, 2006
  • Speaker: 12:00pm (noon) - 1:00pm
  • Q & A: 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Epler Gymnasium (Building 9)

Speaker Biography: Alfonso de Maria y Campos, Mexican Consul General

Alfonso de Maria y Campos.Alfonso de Maria y Campos pursued his doctoral studies at Oxford University from 1975 to 1977 in English, French and Italian. Maria y Campos has been in government service since 1985 in Mexico over Foreign Relations, Foreign Service and Culture. Prior to that he pursued an academic career. He served as Commissioner of the National Council on Arts and Culture from 1994-2000, then as Director General of North America until 2004. President Vicente Fox appointed him as Consul General of Mexico in San Francisco and is currently serving in that position. He has taught history at the National University of Mexico and economics at the Institute of Technology of Mexico (ITAM) and is the author of several articles and books.