For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf by Ntozake Shange - Spring 2012, Ohlone College Book Club

Covers for the DVD and book.Watch the film and talk about the book! Come for all or some of both or either.

The Film

Watch the film For Colored Girls (based on the book For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf):

  • Monday, February 27, 2012
  • 4:00pm
  • Library, Room 1305B, Building 1, third floor, Fremont campus

The Book

Talk about the book For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf:

  • Tuesday, February 28, 2012
  • 4:00pm
  • Library, Room 1305B, Building 1, third floor, Fremont campus

No preregistration is necessary—just show up.

These events are open to Ohlone College students and employees.

About the book

One night while driving home after teaching an evening class and feeling especially depressed, Shange saw a huge rainbow over the city of Oakland, California, and realized that women have a right to survive, because as she asserted in a 1976 New York Times interview, they “have as much right and as much purpose for being here as air and mountains do.” In that same interview, Shange explained that she realized that the rainbow is “the possibility to start all over again with the power and beauty of ourselves.” Her experience inspired the title of for colored girls
—From "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is Enuf." Drama for Students. Ed. David M. Galens and Lynn M. Spampinato. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 1998. 21-37. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 7 Feb. 2012.

About the author

Born Paulette Williams on October 18, 1948, Shange, at the age of twenty-three, adopted the Zulu name Ntozake (pronounced “en-toe-zak-ee” and meaning “she who comes with her own things”) Shange (pronounced “shon-gay” and meaning “who walks like a lion”) as a name more appropriate to her poetic talents. She felt that her Anglo-Saxon last name was associated with slavery and her given name was a feminized version of the male name Paul. Shange once stated in an interview that she changed her name to disassociate herself from the history of a culture that championed slavery.