Darren Bardell, Professor - History & Political Science Departments

Contact Information

 Darren Bardell teaching.Darren Bardell
Professor
History Department
Political Science Department
(510) 659-6115
dbardell@ohlone.edu
Room 6308, Building 6, third floor, Fremont campus

Office Hours

  • Monday: 12:30pm - 2:00pm
  • Wednesday: 12:45pm - 2:00pm
  • Or by appointment: Email or call my office phone to set up a meeting time

Courses Taught at Ohlone

All of these courses are Web Enhanced or Hybrid via Canvas. Ohlone College Canvas Student Information is available on the Online Education website.

Classroom

  • History 104A: Western Civilization with a World Perspective until 1600
  • History 117A: The History of the United States from Colonization to 1877
  • History 117B: History of the United States from 1877 to the Present
  • History 118: The Making of Modern America

Online

  • History 142: History of Rock and Roll: Music and Culture of the 1960s. Cross Listed as Interdisciplinary Studies 143, and Music 123.
  • History 118: The Making of Modern America
  • History 117a: The History of the United States from Colonization to 1877
  • History 117b: The History of the United States from 1877 to the Present
  • History 104A: Western Civilization with a World Perspective until 1600
  • History 104B: Western Civilization with a World Perspective from 1600

Textbooks, Online Access Codes, Other Supplies and Resources

Most Ohlone College classes require the purchase of a textbook, and some classes require the purchase of online access codes (also known as keys) or other supplies. Most of these purchases are available at the Ohlone College Bookstore.

Students may also be required to pay additional fees for access to online resources that are not available through the Ohlone College Bookstore. Please check with the instructor.

More at Textbooks: Information and Purchasing, including Online Orders, Newark Center Textbooks and Supplies, Book Buybacks, and Textbook Costs.

Biography

I was born in Upstate New York but moved to Virginia for High School, attending Fork Union Military Academy. After graduating, I went to the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland (Go Navy, Beat Army!). I left Annapolis after two years (and before earning my commission) and served out the remainder of my enlistment onboard a naval destroyer.

After completing my active duty, I moved to Santa Barbara, California, to finish out my Naval Reserves commitment and complete my Bachelor’s degree. To save money and to guarantee my entrance into UCSB, I attended Santa Barbara City College (SBCC). This was my first exposure to community college and I loved it. In fact, I did not want to leave and if they had offered a 4 year degree program, I probably would have stayed. In any event, I transferred to UCSB where I completed a Bachelor of Arts in U.S. History.

I worked a “real job” (bosses, salary, no Summers off!) for a few years before deciding to return to graduate school to become a college professor. I earned a Master of Arts degree in History from San Diego State University and a Ph.D. (ABD) in American History from Temple University (I am married with 2 young children so I probably will not be defending my dissertation any time soon).

My experience as a student at SBCC convinced me that a community college would be an absolutely perfect place to teach (my second place dream job once becoming a Naval Aviator was no longer an option) and so, after completing my course work at Temple, I applied at several California community colleges for a full-time, tenure track position and was hired at Ohlone in 2004.

I earned tenure in 2009 and will most likely spend my entire career here. Ohlone College is a fabulous place to work and teaching here has never felt like a “job.” I am an officer in our faculty union and I participate on several campus-wide shared governance committees.

My research interests are in U.S. Diplomatic History (sometimes called “foreign relations”) and I teach several U.S. History courses at the College (including my new favorite, “The History or Rock and Roll: Music and Culture of the 1960s”--what's not to like?).

I generally view history through a social/cultural lens and will always ask students to discuss the significance of events based on how they impacted U.S. citizens in their daily lives. I live in the East Bay.