• Looking in the Key of Listening
    • October 1, 2018 - November 8, 2018
    • Mixed Media work from a diverse group of emerging Bay Area artists.
    • Artists include Andrea Ortiz Galdámez, Redwood Hill, Julianna Lopez, Cassidy Schmitt, Verónica Yazmín, Zikaya Zazaboi.

The exhibit is open to the public M/W 11:00 am-4:00 pm, T/TH 12:00 pm-4:00 pm and by appointment through November 8, 2018. A reception and panel discussion with the artists will be held Wednesday, October 17 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm and is open to the public.

 A mixed media exhibit featuring the work of a diverse group of emerging Bay Area artists who explore identity through the lens of race, ethnicity, family and gender.

Artists include Andrea Ortiz Galdámez, Redwood Hill, Julianna Lopez, Cassidy Schmitt, Verónica Yazmín, Zikaya Zazaboi.

  • Artists Talk and Reception
    • ​​​​​​​Wednesday, October 17 from 11:00 am-12:30 pm
    • Free and open to the public

Curatorial Statement

We are pleased to present the work of Andrea Ortiz Galdámez, Redwood Hill, Julianna Lopez,

Cassidy Schmitt, Verónica Yazmín, and Zakiya Zazaboi is the exhibition, LOOKING IN THE KEY OF LISTENING.  

This exhibit was organized and installed by student curators Alexandra Becerra-Perez, Urla Hill, Tongdu Liu, Wyndham Robertson, Tu Tran, Karl Ventajar, Rosa Vo, and Jiamao Yuan.

As curators, we ask you to do more than just look upon entering LOOKING IN THE KEY OF LISTENING. As visitors, we ask you to explore the deeper meanings behind the work of this diverse group of emerging Bay Area artists. This work focuses on the artists’ experience of identity, emerging in the context of race, ethnicity, gender, and family. The exhibit asks you to be an active, rather than passive viewer with the aim of encouraging dialogue. It asks you to see and hear the perspectives presented and engage with the images self-reflectively.

‘To Look’ is a verb. But it can be used as a noun to mean “the act of looking at, examining, trying to find or considering something.” Similarly, active listening requires that we work towards understanding.

You enter the exhibit with your own experiences of identity through race, ethnicity, and gender, to imagine the artists’ perspectives. The exhibit asks each of us to examine: How do your experiences impact your view of beauty, joy, and awe; sadness, anguish, and pain? How is what you see a reflection of who you are, and how you see yourself, your relationships, and life purpose?